Mount Kanchenjunga Expedition(8586m) - 58 Days

Kangchenjunga, also spelled Kanchenjunga, is the third highest mountain stood at a height of 8,586 m. The expedition of Mount Kanchenjunga is considered to be one of the toughest one. It lies between Nepal and Sikkim, India. In 1955, Joe Brown and George Band made the first ascent on 25 May, followed by Norman Hardie and Tony Streather on 26 May. The full team also included John Clegg (team doctor), Charles Evans (team leader), John Angelo Jackson, Neil Mather, and Tom Mackinnon.

The ascent proved that Aleister Crowley’s 1905 route (also investigated by the 1954 reconnaissance) was viable. The route starts on the Yalung Glacier to the southwest of the peak and climbs the Yalung Face, which is 3,000 meters (10,000 ft) high. The main feature of this face is the “Great Shelf”, a large sloping plateau at around 7,500 meters (24,600 ft), covered by a hanging glacier. The route is almost entirely on snow, glacier, and icefall; the summit ridge itself can involve a small amount of travel on the rock. The first ascent expedition made six camps above their base camp, two below the Shelf, two on it, and two above it. They started on 18 April, and everyone was back to base camp by 28 May.
The Kangchenjunga Himal section of the Himalayas lies both in Nepal and India and encompasses 16 peaks over 7,000 m (23,000 ft). In the north, it is limited by the Lhonak Chu, Goma Chu, and Jongsang La, and in the east by the Teesta River. The western limit runs from the Jongsang La down the Gingsang and Kangchenjunga glaciers and the rivers of Ghunsa and Tamur. Kanchenjunga rises about 20 km (12 mi) south of the general alignment of the Great Himalayan range about 125 km (78 mi) east-south-east of Mount Everest as the crow flies. South of the southern face of Kanchenjunga runs the 3,000–3,500 m (9,800–11,500 ft) high Singalila Ridge that separates Sikkim from Nepal and northern West Bengal.
Kangchenjunga and its satellite peaks form a huge mountain massif. The main ridge of the massif runs from north-north-east to south-south-west and forms a watershed to several rivers. Together with ridges running roughly from east to west, they form a giant cross. These ridges contain a host of peaks between 6,000 and 8,586 m (19,685 and 28,169 ft). The northern section includes Yalung Kang, Kangchenjunga Central and South, Kangbachen, Kirat Chuli, and Gimmigela Chuli, and runs up to the Jongsang La. The eastern ridge in Sikkim includes Siniolchu. The southern section runs along the Nepal-Sikkim border and includes Kabru I to III. This ridge extends southwards to the Singalila Ridge. The western ridge culminates in the Kumbhakarna, also known as Jannu.
Four main glaciers radiate from the peak, pointing roughly to the north-east, south-east, north-west and south-west. The Zemu glacier in the north-east and the Talung glacier in the south-east drain to the Teesta River; the Yalung glacier in the south-west and the Kangchen glacier in the north-west drain to the Arun and Koshi rivers. The glaciers spread over the area above approximately 5,000 m (16,000 ft), and the glacierized area covers about 314 km2 (121 sq mi) in total. There are 120 glaciers in the Kanchenjunga Himal, of which 17 are debris-covered. Between 1958 and 1992, more than half of 57 examined glaciers had retreated, possibly due to rising air temperature.
Kangchenjunga Main is the highest elevation of the Brahmaputra River basin, which forms part of the southeast Asian monsoon regime and is among the globally largest river basins. Kangchenjunga is one of six peaks above 8,000 m (26,000 ft) located in the basin of the Koshi river, which is among the largest tributaries of the Ganges. The Kangchenjunga massif forms also part of the Ganges Basin.
Although it is the third highest peak in the world, Kangchenjunga is only ranked 29th by topographic prominence, a measure of a mountain’s independent stature. The key col for Kangchenjunga lies at a height of 4,664 meters (15,302 ft), along the watershed boundary between Arun and Brahmaputra rivers in Tibet. It is, however, the 4th most prominent peak in the Himalaya, after Everest, and the western and eastern anchors of the Himalaya, Nanga Parbat, and Namcha Barwa, respectively.
There are four climbing routes to reach the summit of Kangchenjunga, three of which are in Nepal from the southwest, northwest, and northeast, and one from northeastern Sikkim in India. To date, the northeastern route from Sikkim has been successfully used only three times. The Indian government has banned expeditions to Kanchenjunga, and therefore this route has been closed since 2000.
According to myths, the area around Kangchenjunga is said to be home to a mountain deity, called Dzö-nga or “Kangchenjunga Demon”, a type of yeti or rakshasa. A British geological expedition in 1925 spotted a bipedal creature which they asked the locals about, who referred to it as the “Kangchenjunga Demon”.
For generations, there have been legends recounted by the inhabitants of the areas surrounding Mount Kanchenjunga, both in Sikkim and in Nepal, that there is a valley of immortality hidden on its slopes. These stories are well known to both the original inhabitants of the area, the Lepcha people, and those of the Tibetan Buddhist cultural tradition. In Tibetan, this valley is known as Beyul Demoshong. In 1962 a Tibetan Lama by the name of Tulshuk Lingpa led over 300 followers into the high snow slopes of Kanchenjunga to ‘open the way’ to Beyul Demoshong. The story of this expedition is recounted in the 2011 book A Step Away from Paradise.
Due to its remote location in Nepal and the difficulty involved in accessing it from India, the Kangchenjunga region is not much explored by trekkers. It has, therefore, retained much of its pristine beauty. In Sikkim too, trekking into the Kangchenjunga region has just recently been permitted. The Goecha La trek is gaining popularity amongst tourists. It goes to the Goecha La Pass, located right in front of the huge southeast face of Kangchenjunga. Another trek to Green Lake Basin has recently been opened for trekking. This trek goes to the northeast side of Kangchenjunga along the famous Zemu Glacier. The film Singalila in the Himalaya is a journey around Kangchenjunga.

DayActivities
Day 01Arrive Kathmandu
Day 02Rest/Preparation
Day 03Preparation
Day 04Fly Suketar; trek Lali Kharka 2220m
Day 05Trek Kande Banjyang (2240m)
Day 06Trek Phomphe (1890m)
Day 07Trek Yamphudin (1690m)
Day 08Trek Amji Khola (2340)
Day 09Trek Torontan (2990m)
Day 10Trek Tseram (3870m)
Day 11Trek Ramche (4620m)
Day 12Rest/acclimatization
Day 13Kanchunjunga Glacier
Day 14Kanchanjunga Base Camp
Day 15/49Climbing period
Day 50Trek Ramche
Day 51Trek Amji Khola
Day 52Trek Yamphudin
Day 53Trek Khewang
Day 54Trek Lali Kharka
Day 55Trek Suketar
Day 56Fly Kathmandu
Day 57Rest
Day 58Depart Kathmandu

What is Included

  • Arrival & departure transfer from and to the airport & hotels
  • 5 nights bed & breakfast accommodation in a 3* hotel in Kathmandu (twin share)
  • Teahouse accommodation, wherever available, on full board (breakfast, lunch & dinner) during trek
  • Camping accommodation, wherever teahouses are not available, on full board during trek
  • Base Camp accommodation with individual sleeping tent with mattress
  • Base Camp service (shared with group)-kitchen tent with cook, kitchen boy, dining tent with tables and chairs, shower tent, toilet tent, storage tent, gas heater etc.
  • High camps during the climb with high food
  • Kathmandu-Suketar-Kathmandu flight
  • 1 climbing Sherpa for 1 climbing member during the expedition
  • Cost of Liaison officer
  • Royalty, permit & other fees
  • Required number of porters
  • 3 bottles of oxygen with mask regulator for member & 2 bottles of oxygen for Sherpa
  • Rope fixing charge
  • Medical Kit & Walkie Talkie
  • Salary & load carrying bonus for Sherpa (this bonus does not include the summit bonus)
  • Climbing equipment, transportation, accommodation, food, salary and insurance for Sherpa and other staffs
  • Farewell dinner at an authentic Nepali restaurant in Kathmandu

What is Excluded

  • International airfare to and from Kathmandu & Nepal visa fee
  • Travel & medical insurance including insurance for emergency rescue & evacuation
  • Lunches and dinners in Kathmandu
  • Personal expenses such as telephone, laundry, bottled water, bar bills, etc.
  • Trekking/climbing gear (also available on hire)
  • Summit bonus for Sherpa & tips for local staffs
  • Any extra cost arising out of natural calamities or cancellation of the program
  • All other items not mentioned in the list of ‘Price Includes’

Clothes Attributes

FabricBreathabilityWaterproofWind StopperStretchiness
FleeceExcellentPoorPoorExcellent
Laminated Soft-shell GoodGoodFairGood
Double weave softshellExcellentPoorFairExcellent
Waterproof breathable laminated softshellFairGoodExcellentFair
Waterproof breathableFairExcellentExcellentPoor

Footwear

  • Climbing boots
  • Cold weather boots for base camp
  • Trainers
  • Comfortable sandals
  • Lightweight hiking boots
  • Gaiters
  • Booties
  • Light socks
  • Heavy socks

Clothing

  • Lightweight long underwear top
  • Expedition weight long underwear tops
  • Lightweight long underwear bottoms
  • Expedition weight underwear bottoms
  • Briefs/Underwear
  • Short-sleeved shirts/T-shirts
  • Jacket synthetic or fleece
  • Synthetic insulated pants
  • Down suit
  • Down insulated jacket with hood
  • Down pants
  • Waterproof breathable jacket & pants
  • Wind shirts/light shell jacket
  • One-piece climbing shell (optional)

Head & Hand Gear

  • Lightweight synthetic liner glove
  • Headlamp with spare bulb and extra alkaline batteries
  • Windstopper fleece gloves
  • Insulated climbing gloves
  • Mittens with liners
  • Sun hat
  • Wool or fleece hat
  • Balaclava
  • Face mask
  • Mountain helmet

Accessories

  • UV Sunglasses
  • Glacier glasses
  • Ski goggles
  • Spare batteries

Climbing Equipment

  • Ice axe
  • Crampons
  • Harness
  • Carabiners
  • Webbing
  • Perlon cord
  • Ascenders
  • Rappel device
  • Camping Gear
  • Backpack
  • Day pack
  • Two Sleeping bags:-40C/-30F
  • Compression stuff sacks
  • THermal sleeping pad
  • Foam pad
  • 2 Water bottles
  • Lightweight steel thermal bottle
  • Pee bottle
  • Pee Funnel for Women.
  • Pack towel
  • Extendable 2 trekking poles
  • Swiss army knife
  • Large mug, plastic bowl, fork, and spoon

Medical & Personal

  • Sunscreen
  • Lip screen
  • Toiletry kit
  • Personal medication
  • Water purification tablets
  • Zip-loc bags
  • Baby wipes or wet towels
  • Earplugs

Travel Items

  • 2 large expedition duffel bag
  • Small travel bag
  • Nylon stuff sacks
  • Lightweight cotton long sleeve shirt
  • Hiking pants and/or skirt/sarong
  • Lightweight pants

Tourist Visa Information

All visitors except the Indian nationals must hold a passport and valid visa in order to enter Nepal. Visas can be obtained at the Nepalese diplomatic missions and consulates abroad and also at entry points in Nepal. In order to obtain a visa at the airport or any of the land entry points, you are required to complete a visa form and provide a recent passport photograph and payment in cash.

Visa Charges

Gratis visa for 30 days available only for tourists of SAARC countries

Multiple entries 15 days – US$ 30 or equivalent convertible currency

Multiple entries 30 days – US$ 50 or equivalent convertible currency

Multiple entries 90 days – US$ 125 or equivalent convertible currency

Tourist Visa Extension

If you wish to extend your visa, you can do this at the Department of Immigration in Kathmandu

  • Tourist visa extension is done for minimum 15 days with USD 45 and USD 3 per day for additional days.
  • In the case of delay less than 150 days additional USD 5 per day as of late fine.

For more information: http://www.nepalimmigration.gov.np/page/tourist-visa

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Trip Facts

  • 58 Days
  • Kathmandu
  • Kathmandu
  • 8,586 m
  • Strenuous Plus
  • Expedition
  • April and May & October and November
  • Mt. Kangchenjunga is the third highest mountain in the world. Also known as the queen of the mountains it is famous for its mighty Kangchenjunga glacier.